What is the technology job outlook looking like in U.S. and Ontario?
28 October 2012

What is the technology job outlook looking like in U.S. and Ontario?

What is the U.S. Story?

100,000 new jobs for tech industry through midyear 2012, report says

Three of the four high-tech job sectors analyzed by TechAmerica Foundation saw modest positive job growth in 2012. They warned against taking the industry's relative job strength for granted.

The four sectors TechAmerica highlighted in its report are: software services, which added 50,800 jobs between January and June 2012; engineering and tech services, which added 49,900 jobs; technology manufacturing, which gained 9,200 jobs; and communications services, which lost 10,700 jobs.

"While the tech industry has weathered the downturn better than most, we can't take its strength for granted," said Jennifer Kerber, president of TechAmerica Foundation, in a statement. "America can only realize the full promise of an innovation economy with smarter public policies focused on developing and attracting the best talent, investing in research and development, and growing and securing our information infrastructure."

At the start of 2011, U.S. tech employment was at 5.8 million jobs. The industry saw monthly job gains in 16 of the 18 months between January 2011 and June 2012, TechAmerica reports, yielding an increase of 3.3% or nearly 200,000 jobs.

While the growth has been modest, it is up and fairly consistent. With job growth in three of the four tech sectors, we remain optimistic about continued growth into the future.

The IT industry lost 1,700 jobs in September, marking the first monthly decline in jobs since August 20100.

Many of the IT job segments in the government jobs reports, in particular those in IT services, have been on strong and sustained growth runs for nearly two years. Companies are actively searching for talent and hiring for the future.

What is Ontario's Story?

Regionally, job growth over the last three months has been driven almost entirely by metro Toronto and Hamilton-Niagara. Growth in these regions has been largely offset by declines in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ottawa, Northern Ontario, Kingston-Pembroke and Stratford-Bruce.

In Ontario Toronto, Ottawa, and Kitchener-Waterloo have the largest volume of technology jobs.

Toronto (Improving)

The latest seasonally adjusted, short-term trends in labour market indicators are positive. Over the latest three months, average employment increased by an estimated 42,900 persons (1.4 per cent) from the previous three months, while the average unemployment rate was little changed at 8.6 per cent.

Ottawa (Negative)

The latest seasonally adjusted, short-term trends in labour market indicators are negative. Over the latest three months, average employment decreased by an estimated 15,000 persons (2.1 per cent) from the previous three months, while the average unemployment rate increased from 6.0 per cent to 6.4 per cent of the labour force.

Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie (Negative)

The latest seasonally adjusted, short-term trends in labour market indicators are negative. Over the latest three months, average employment decreased by an estimated 16,000 persons (2.3 per cent) from the prior three months, while the average unemployment rate increased from 6.6 per cent to 6.9 per cent of the labour force.